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If you want to learn more about vision therapy, eye doctors, eye wear, contacts, optometry, eye glasses, lenses, frames, trends, you have come to the right place! We will periodically update our blog with new content to help educate those who may not be familiar with the world of optometry. If you have any questions, or have a specific topic you would like us to cover for our next blog, feel free to leave us a comment!

By Hallie Jenks


As someone with high myopia, I love my contacts, I also love transition eyeglasses, so you can only imagine my delight when I first heard about Transition contacts. I’ve worn contacts fairly consistently since I got my first pair about 10 years ago. When I got into optics around two and a half years ago I had heard about the developing new lenses that are Acuvue Oasys Transitions Contacts. I couldn’t believe it! What leaps in technology! So when they were finally released, I asked my doctor to request a pair of trials for me.


I had been using the Biofinity monthly lens for as long as I can remember, so switching to the Acuvue Oasys lens was exciting. They were comfy, vision was clear, and my eyes loved them. The lens has a consistent 15% gray tint to them, which honestly, inside I wasn’t able to tell a visual difference. I would walk outside into the blazing summer sun, and usually by the time I got to my car in the parking lot, I no longer needed to squint. About 60 seconds. I would come in from outside, note that the room was maybe a little darker than usual, but soon forget all about it. About 90 seconds.


How is this possible?! If my contact breaks will I get transition fluid in my eye!? Well, using the same tech that they do for transition eyeglasses, they build the photochromic properties into the lens so even if it tears you’re not going to get anything bad in your eye. They also do better with the heat from your eye, making them transition faster compared to regular eyeglasses.


Of course, with any transitions, they will not work to full capacity while in the car or anywhere you are not in direct sunlight. So if you are wearing a hat or sitting in the shade, they will not get to the full 70% tint. Usually while I drive I would say they are at about 30-50% tint. They are also not a suitable substitute for sunglasses, they only protect where the lens is covering, so the white of your eyes, and the skin around your eyes are still going to be exposed to the UV light.


Something I should mention is that they definitely change color. I will be outside with friends when suddenly they do a full stop and demand, “What is wrong with your eyes? You look like a demon!” As comical as I find this, it is not a common occurrence. I have golden brown eyes so if you are not paying close attention, I would see how it might glaze past you. However, with lighter eye colors like blue or green, people might take more notice. I have also had an experience where I will check my rearview mirror and do a double take because my eyes are a weird color.



My ideal time to use these would be on outings where you might not want to be wearing sunglasses. They are also great for athletics. Don't want to squint into the sun while a ball comes flying at you? Try these out. They’re perfect for any field or court game. They’re also fantastic if, like me, you have light sensitivity. After my initial trial run, I went back to my old contacts, I definitely noticed a difference, especially while driving. I was squinting more, everything was so bright. Were the lights in here always this annoying? That’s not to say they make you feel like you’re in a cave. Far from it. For me it was more like I lost the urge to squint and reach for my sunglasses at every opportunity.



Sounds like fun right? If you already use the Acuvue Oasys lens, all you have to do is ask the doctor to add transitions to your prescription. As of right now the lenses are still only available in spherical prescriptions so if you have a higher Astigmatism you might have to wait. They are also currently working on making them in the daily lenses, so people with allergies can also enjoy them soon.


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With Halloween fast approaching, many people look to colored contacts, specifically of the spooky variety, as a way to level up their transformation skills. For those new to the world of colored contacts, here is some important information to know before you shop.


Not All Contacts Are Created Equal


You will notice as you begin your search for colored contacts that there is quite the range of prices for colored contacts you can find on the internet. Why is that? Well, as with most of everything you buy on the internet, you get what you pay for. Meaning that if you buy the cheapest pair of spooky lenses you can buy, do not expect something of higher quality. And when it comes to your eyes, our suggestion here at Choice Eye Center is to invest in something that will not hurt your eyes. We are all about the health of your eyes.


The Risks Involved With Colored Contacts


The cheaper material that is used to make the cheaper contact lenses means that oxygen is less permeable. This means that there is a greater risk of possible complications occurring, including irritation, dryness, redness, ulcers, bacterial infection and more. If you do decide to go with the cheaper option for colored contacts, please remember to be responsible and not wear them for long periods of time.


The wrong size will also have an effect on your comfort level. Even without a prescription in your contact lens, it is still important to have a contact lens fit examination with your eye doctor to get the appropriate size for your eye. A contact lens that is too small for your eye will cause irritation and make your eyes tired. A contact lens that is too large will move around and most likely fall out of your eye given enough blinking. Either of which is likely to cause redness and irritation.


Colored contacts, although mainly used for cosmetic reasons, are still a medical grade device, and as such, should be treated with the appropriate amount of care.



Why do I need a contact lens fit?


If you call an optometrist's office and ask about ordering colored contact lenses, you will hear that they want you to come in for a contact lens fit examination. Many of you might wonder why this would be necessary if you are not getting a prescription contact lens and are simply looking for something for a costume. You may even feel like the optometrist is just trying to get more money out of you. Eye doctors are held responsible for giving medically sound advice for the health of your eyes. Telling you that you can order colored contacts without a contact lens fit would be irresponsible of the eye doctor because there are risks to getting an incorrect contact lens fit, even if there is no prescription involved (as mentioned above). Even if only worn for a day, you will want to have a contact lens that is as comfortable as possible and will not cause unnecessary irritation and other eye problems. Another part of the contact lens fit is ensuring that you can insert and remove the contact lenses without damaging or injuring your eye.


The Wide Range - Price And Availability


So now that we have gone over why you should not just go with the cheapest option available, let us go over why you might see quite the considerable price range even amongst more quality colored contact lenses. Even with standard optical, prescription contact lenses, there are a variety of different types and styles to choose from. From dailies to a monthly lens, from spherical to toric (dealing with the shape of the eye), they come in a wide variety of options to try to find the best option for each and every patient.


So not only will there be a possible high price for a non prescription colored contact lens, or "plano" as we like to use in the industry, prescription colored contacts will run even higher.


Spherical lenses are more common than toric lenses. This deals with the shape of the lens and the eye. But to get the right prescription available, manufacturers are more limited on what designs are available in this type of lens. So if you are looking to get a prescription colored contact lens, it is important to note that you are going to be more limited as far as design option. These prescription lenses are more expensive than plano lenses.


Even more complicated than spherical lenses are toric lenses (lenses for stronger astigmatism.) The shape of this lens is even more difficult to do with complicated designs. So if your prescription requires a toric lens, you will have even less options to choose from as far as design goes. These lenses are also known to be the most expensive due to the shape of the eye.


In Summary


The health and well-being of your eyes are important. Our advice is that cheap short term fun with cheap colored contacts is not worth the long term risks to your eyes. If you want to use colored contacts, there is a way to do them, just do it safely. See your eye doctor, get a contact lens fit, and pay more to ensure you do not risk the health or comfort of your eyes.


We at Choice Eye Center are happy to answer any more questions you have regarding colored contacts and lenses. Currently, you can order high quality colored contact lenses through us. Call us today to schedule a contact lens fit examination. To get your contacts before Halloween, orders must be placed by October 16th.



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ery time you go to the eye doctor one of the first things they do is check your visual acuity. Your visual acuity is the sharpness of letters or images at a fixed distance according to a fixed standard.


Let’s break it down in terms that are easier to understand.


We all have heard the term 20/20 but what exactly does it mean.

According to the Snellen chart, 20/20 is the standard for normal vision. The Snellen chart is used in the United States by eye doctors, (optometrists and ophthalmologists), as well as other doctors. There is no such thing as perfect vision. (The only person that has perfect vision is Superman.)



The Snellen chart was developed by Herman Snellen, a Dutch Ophthalmologist, in 1862. The chart is based off of a distance of 20 feet and lines of letters that are a specific size with the largest one on top, gradually getting smaller at the bottom. According to the Snellen chart, 20/20 means you have normal vision at a distance of 20 feet.


This picture might clear that up.


Patient A has 20/70 vision so they are only able to read line 3 on the Snellen chart at 20 feet away. Patient B who has 20/20 vision can read the same line at 70 feet away.


Here is a video that also explains it. What is 20/20 Vision?


Stop by for your FREE visual acuity screening Tuesday - Friday from 10am - 6pm.


Text us to schedule your next complete eye exam 801-987-8698.


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